Topic » 7 Billion

In late 2011, the world's population is estimated to reach 7 billion. Demographers project a range of possibilities for future population growth, with the most commonly cited figure being a world population of 9 billion by 2043.

The 9 billion number assumes a dramatic decline in fertility rates across the world, converging to 2.1 children per woman. This is unlikely unless we respond to the 215 million women around the world who want to prevent pregnancy but need contraception. In nations such as Yemen, Afghanistan, and much of sub-Saharan Africa, women continue to have an average of more than 5 children.

Nearly half the world'ss population—some 3 billion people—is under the age of 25 and entering their childbearing years. Their childbearing choices, and the information and services available to them, will determine whether human numbers climb to anywhere from 8 billion to 11 billion by mid-century.

A common argument is that the earth cannot sustain 7 billion people. PAI believes the issue is not the total number, but how much they consume and where they are concentrated. The average person in the United States, for example consumes almost fifty times more energy than a person in Ghana. And the vast majority of greenhouse gasses have come from the developed world. If the problem is overconsumption, the international policy focus should be on developed nations's consumption, not African fertility rates.

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Why World Population Day Matters

July 11, 2012

Originally posted on National Geographic In case you hadn’t heard, today is World Population Day and there are now about 7,058,000,000 of us. Another 200,000 will be added tomorrow. Last October, when the world hit the 7 billion mark, Population Action International developed an online … Continue reading »

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The Future I Want for My Great Grandchildren

May 24, 2012

Achieving global sustainability: The Elders in conversation with young global leaders Nelson Mandela once said that, ‘‘It always seems impossible until it’s done.” The world has been discussing sustainable development way before I was born. Now we have a chance … Continue reading »

Article

What’s Your Number?

January 26, 2012

On October 31, the world’s 7 billionth person was born. Each of us is part of that population. With the world growing by more than 200,000 people a day, it’s hard to know where you fit in. Until now… Continue reading »

Press Release

PAI applauds selection of Gabriel Jaramillo as head of Global Fund

January 25, 2012

PAI applauds the decision of the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria’s Board of Directors to appoint Mr. Gabriel Jaramillo as the Fund’s Managing Director. Continue reading »

Press Release

Weathering Change honored at 32nd Annual Global Media Awards

January 12, 2012

Why Population Matters, a new publication, explains how population is connected to other development issues such as maternal health, poverty, security and climate change. Continue reading »

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Steal My Idea, Please! Why An Open Source Attitude Can Make Apps Go Viral

November 7, 2011

Last week I got ripped off, but for the first time, I’m happy about it. They didn’t just steal my wallet and phone—they took something that me and a team of people spent months to create.

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Food Security for 7 Billion

November 1, 2011

This week, the birth of a baby somewhere took the world population past the 7 billion mark. That’s something to celebrate. Few thought the world could sustain that many people, ever – yet here we are.

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Press Release

Day of 7 Billion Underscores Why Population Matters in Our World

October 31, 2011

Washington, DC – Today, the United Nations estimates the world population reached 7 billion. Population Action International marked the birth of the 7 billionth person with the launch of a new report, Why Population Matters. This adds to its other … Continue reading »

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Stemming population growth is a cheap way to limit climate change

October 31, 2011

There’s no one way to suddenly cut carbon emissions, but better family planning where it’s most needed is a cost-effective start.

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Report

Why Population Matters

October 31, 2011

Why Population Matters, a new publication, explains how population is connected to other development issues such as maternal health, poverty, security and climate change. Continue reading »

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