In Sub-Saharan Africa, more than 22 million people are living with HIV. And 53 million women in this region want to avoid pregnancy but cannot access contraception. In One Place, a new film by PAI shows why integrating family planning, reproductive health and HIV/AIDS is a priority for women and young people in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Men Living with HIV

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Hear Professor Luo

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An Integrated Clinic

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Hear a Clinic Nurse

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In One Place: Delivery Reproductive Health and HIV Services Together

In One Place shows why integrating family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) and HIV/AIDS is a priority for women and young people in sub-Saharan Africa. Through the voices of women in Zambia living with HIV, the film documents how stand-alone, separate health services can result in a range of missed opportunities, poor health outcomes and lost productivity. Integration means offering FP/RH and HIV services together at the same time and in the same facility. It is a client-centered, rights-based approach that improves lives for women and youth living with and at risk of HIV.

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND HIV ARE INTERCONNECTED

Women in sub-Saharan Africa face a dual threat of unplanned pregnancy and HIV infection unequalled in the rest of the world.

Countries with the greatest burden of HIV also have high levels of women who want to avoid pregnancy but lack contraception. Rates of unintended pregnancy are particularly high for women living with HIV, and family planning programs have been
underutilized in HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs.

WHY INTEGRATION

In One Place Infographic

HIV is a sexual and reproductive health issue: Women in sub-Saharan Africa face a dual threat of unplanned pregnancy and HIV infection unequalled in the rest of the world.Countries with the greatest burden of HIV also have high levels of women who
want to avoid pregnancy but lack contraception.

Women living with HIV have high demand for family planning and reproductive health services: Several country-specific studies have documented high levels of unintended pregnancy among women living with HIV, often at a rate higher than for all women of reproductive age. Integrating FP/RH and HIV information, services and supplies will help ensure that the health care needs and rights of women living with HIV are addressed in a holistic manner.

Family planning is a “best buy” within HIV prevention, care and treatment: Dollar for dollar, family planning programs have the potential to prevent nearly 30 percent more HIV-positive births than a treatment-only approach. The World Health Organization calls for the provision of family planning information and contraceptives as one of four key components of successful programs to prevent mother-tochild transmission of HIV. Yet in practice, contraception is neither widely used nor understood as an essential HIV prevention tool.

Integration improves access to services and continuity of care, and reduces stigma: Individuals make greater use of services if they are easy to access, resulting in improved health and behavioral outcomes.Offering FP/RH and HIV/AIDS services at a single site can help overcome stigma and discrimination that impede access to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care.

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